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LangX is an ongoing collaborative attempt to create a new constructed international auxiliary language (IAL), based upon the following three principles:

[1] We are taking a strictly though not exclusively scientific approach, our central "working hypothesis" being that a global IAL might now be constructed on the jargon -> pidgin -> vernacular progression (JPVP) model which has been repeatedly validated in the past, albeit on a smaller scale. A related hypothesis is the concept of a universal linguistic hierarchy (based on the registers between acrolect and basilect found within existing languages), in which the best or ideal features of all languages might ultimately find their place.

[2] Our objective is not to increase the large number of IAL attempts by one but rather to eventually see them reduced to one through voluntary synthesis.

[3] Justice demands that representative elements from all languages be included in an international language; however, reason dictates that this would be impracticable in the short or medium term, since such a language would be excessively complex and too far removed from most peoples' experience. LangX embraces the ideal of universality, but seeks to approach it gradually, according to the JPVP precedent: which would also prescribe a fair balance between "Western" phonology and "Eastern" grammar in the initial stages before a comprehensive universality were possible.

LangX developed out of Lango in the late 1990s and in 2001 I set out provisional initial and long-term timelines:

2005 Inauguration of LangX and international core vocabulary.

2008 Formation of IAL committee.

2011 Publication of international core vocabulary.

2015 Publication of IAL grammar.

As of 2009, the initial timeline remains on course. More details are on the LangX page. The IAL Cause is much bigger than any or all of us, and we recognise that our ad hoc committee is likely to be replaced in due course, in whole or in part. Meanwhile we will do the best we can. The provisional long-term timeline is below.

NB Due to a change of address this website will go offline on or after 20 September 2009, so please change bookmarks to the mirror site http://langx.org, which will continue.

Members of LangX IAL committee, inaugurated in 2008:

Prof. Liu Fengming

Jens Wilkinson          Website

Risto Kupsala          Website

Antony Alexander   (also author of this website: contact)

Many thanks to my fellow LangX IAL committee members for their commitment and support, and also to Profs. Bruce M Beach and Jonathan B Britten and others who have assisted in the past. Pursuing the LangX timeline, our principal focus until 2011 will be a provisional global core vocabulary, to which end new wordlists comprised of words from existing languages would be welcome, and would be accredited.

Illustrated Lecture, AILA 2008, 15th World Congress of Applied Linguistics, Essen, Germany, 26 August 2008

Some Immediate Questions and Answers

The Horns of a Dilemma: A Dialogue

How to Promote an IAL

The Jargon -> Pidgin -> Vernacular Progression

LangX: The World Language Dilemma Resolved

Why the Initial IAL Phonology should be "Western"

Introduction to the Wordlists

Special Wordlist for Tourists etc. (under construction)

International Wordlists (pages under construction)

A Prequel to "Esperanto"?

Nerrière's "Globish" and LangX

International Auxiliary Culture

Previous Suggestions re LangX Phonology/Vocabulary

Global Script Links Page

Two Articles by Prof. Bruce M. Beach

Three Short Articles about LangX by Jens Wilkinson

Pre-2002 Articles about LangX and Complete Text of "Lango" by Robert Craig and Antony Alexander

Si'Sei - A Revised Orthography for English

Useful IAL Links Page by James Chandler

Lang53

27

26

2726 AD

100%

0%

Lang49

26

23

2623 AD

98%

2%

Lang45

25

20

2520 AD

90%

10%

Lang41

24

17

2417 AD

70%

30%

Lang37

23

14

2314 AD

30%

70%

Lang33

22

11

2211 AD

10%

90%

Lang29

21

08

2108 AD

2%

98%

Lang25

20

05

2005 AD

0%

100%

This illustrative timescale shows steps towards a single universal language via an IAL over a long period. As can be seen, the graduated program is mnemonic: Lang25 = 20 (consonants) + 05 (vowels) = 2005 AD etc. One consonant and three vowels are added for each subsequent phase, with the year of official introduction corresponding to the total. It can also be seen that LangX begins at Lang25 as 100% auxilary, i.e. not spoken as a mother tongue or primary language, and that the proportion of mother tongue speakers gradually increases over time until it is 100% after seven centuries. The mnemonic phoneme counts shown are not intended to be other than approximate, and the 721-year timescale itself might prove wholly inaccurate and require replacement, but at least it indicates a transition from pure auxilary to mother tongue, as has been demonstrated within vernacularising pidgins. The table itself gives no more than a partial outline of LangX, with no mention of grammar etc..